National Society for the Gifted & Talented
Summer Institute for the Gifted | Resources for Educators
Academically Gifted Minority Students
Gifted Students
Center for Gifted Education
Gifted Child Quarterly
National Association for Gifted Children
The Association for the Gifted
Gifted and Talented Children
Gifted Education Resource Institute
American Association for Gifted Children
Hoagie's Gifted Education Page
Neag Center for Gifted Education & Talent Development
National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented
Center for Gifted Education Policy
Education Program for Gifted Youth
Gifted and Talented
Gifted Child Society
Uniquely Gifted
Gifted Children
Supporting Emotional Needs of the Gifted
Center for Talented Youth
GT World
Gifted and Talented Students Education Program
Teaching Strategies
Differentiation for High Ability Learners
Gifted and LD
Twice Gifted
Unwrapping the Gifted
Davidson Institute
Mentor
Differentiated Instruction
Gifted Kids' Bill of Rights
Enrichment Materials
The Standards Site
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"The wisest mind has something yet to learn."
George Santayana
Advice From Kids For Kids
How Gifted Children Are Held Back
More Diversity in Honors Classes
Obstacles
50 tips, tricks, & ideas
What to Look for in a Good Gifted Program
Poorest Students Often Miss Out on Gifted Classes
Debunking Myths About Gifted Students
Fuel Creativity in the Classroom
IDEA Applies to Twice Exceptional Students Too
Serving Gifted Students in General Education Classrooms
The One Thing Gifted Kids Want You to Know
Students who are gifted require educational experiences not ordinarily offered in the general school
curriculum to develop demonstrated or potential aptitudes, creativity, and leadership.

Typically, students who are gifted perform significantly above average on standardized measures of
intelligence and excel academically in one or more areas.  Creativity and problem-solving are chief
characteristics associated with giftedness.

Quality research consistently and conclusively demonstrates that students who are gifted appear in all ages,
grade levels, socioeconomic levels, ethnic groups, and both genders in about equal numbers.  However, in
practice, certain groups of students typically go under-identified:  students from low-income families; those

who are culturally or linguistically different, and learners with disabilities.

Studies reveal that most students who are gifted do not match their tested ability with comparable

achievement in school.  The greatest challenge facing these students is achieving their potential.  In spite of
the common belief that they are more capable of success than others, their needs are not clearly understood,
resulting in a high risk of going unchallenged and receiving instruction designed for someone else's needs.

These students benefit from teaching strategies that emphasize creativity, intellectual initiative, critical

thinking skills, leadership, responsibility for learning, flexibility, collaboration, reflective teaching, student
choices,
planning with their teachers, opportunities for mentor partnerships, and curriculum compacting.

Here are some resources to better understand the educational needs of students who are gifted and how to
meet those needs:
There is a broad range of placement and service options for students who are gifted.  Enrichment (additions
to regular programming), acceleration (moving through the regular curriculum at a more rapid rate), "pull-out"
programs, magnet schools, and supported inclusive education in which students remain in general education
classes with the benefit of supplementary aids and services are all effective service delivery
models,
depending on the individual needs of learners.
What it Means to Teach Gifted Learners Well